The Reaching Pot – Transformations with Life #9

I wasn’t sure if I wanted to repurpose this small tea bowl. It was very nicely done, comfortable in the hand, and with a beautiful blue crackle glaze. This early pot got very close to some of the early Korean pots I was inspired by. When I added this little indoor hanging plant, I wasn’t sure how it would react, much less how it would grow. I thought it would hang down over the sides and cover the pot. Well, I was off the mark on that one. Wishing an hour of being transplanted, the plant raised its arms and seemed to grow before my eyes. It’s been happy there ever since.

Please visit the rest of my artwork at Arts M.Perron: http://www.1-mario-perron.pixels.com

You can also see my dedication to sustainable design at Found – The Repurposed Design Company: http://www.found-designs.com

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The Forest Floor – Transformations with Life #8

After planting the four maple seedlings I added some garden moss to keep the soil moist and then I put it in the sun. A few days later other plants started to grow. It looks very much like the floor of the forest with the trees high about and tons of life struggling fort a little sun under the canopy.

The pot is equally alive with textures imitating the magic that occurs in an Anagama kiln, but done in an electric kiln. Old shards of porcelain are fused into the sides and patches of iron oxide emulate natures hand when the flames and smoke paint the pots in a wood fired kiln. I’m very happy with this one.

Please see more of my works at Arts M.Perron: http://www.1-mario-perron.pixels.com

Also, visit my reclaimed items site at Found – The Repurposed Design Company: http://www.found-designs.com

Little Trees – Transformations with Life #4

I have all these little maple trees growing all over my yard. At first I wasn’t sure what to do with them. Now I have a few ideas. Always fascinated with Bonsais, I thought I could possibly do my own with a Canadian twist. Taking some of my electric-fired, Raku-styled tea bowls and using them as pots just seemed to make sense, especially since I’ve been getting so many ideas from Pinterest to do just this.

For more of my ceramics, visit Arts M.Perron: http://www.1-mario-perron.pixels.com

For more of my repurposing projects, visit Found – The Repurposed Design Company: http://www.found-designs.com

The Potted Pixie – Transformations With Life #2

This simple succulent is elevated and transformed, as is the small tea bowl, now reborn as a planter. The pot now lives into a second life with purpose as the home of this baby plant. Something about how she stands in the pot, full of mischief and reaching to get out and conquer the world, reminded me of images of pixies playing in a child’s bedroom as it slept.

The pot is hand built from a raku stoneware clay body, with a base tapped to a rustic taper. The glaze is achieved by alienating layers of  a Pinel Green, with a high gloss clear, and a surface brushing of a slip mad of the same clay body, mat white glaze, and iron dust.  The inside is coated in a red engobe covered in a clear glaze.

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For more of my pots in their natural state, please visit Arts M.Perron: http://www.1-mario-perron.pixels.com

 

A Touch Beyond Shabby-Chic

These simple and elegant side tables were designed for the dump when I saved them. Like many of the discarded pieces I find, they struck me with possibilities.

Sadly, my enthusiasm got the better of me and I didn’t take the before pictures I usually take. Here are some after the initial cleaning, where we can start to see the different woods and laminates used to enhance the clean lines of some beautiful craftsmanship.

Before Scandanavian Side tables

The choices were clearly deliberate when the carpenter chose his woods, as he has the grains going in perpendicular directions and the smoothly cut and sanded surface is more solid than one could imagine. The pieces aren’t heavy to look at, but are very weighty to carry.

When I first saw them, I thought I was looking at a Scandinavian design, but there are subtle elements in the construction that makes me think this artist also loved Mid-Century Modern lines (the legs are slightly narrower than the top) and the simple strength of Shaker construction (due to their massive weight).

After cleaning them, I did my best to remove the multiple layers of shellac on the surface. Some parts proved too difficult to remove by sanding alone, and when I wet wiped the dust, I found myself enjoying the distressed feel and look of the spaces where some shellac remained. I finished the drawer fronts with s clear finishing wax and the rest with a darker finishing wax, to bring out more of the grain in that different wood, which I believe to be teak.

Dimensions: H- 24″ (61cm) x W- 15″ (38cm) x D- 11″ (28cm)

Price: $250 for the pair.